A while back, if you were looking for the best graphics card under $300, your decision would’ve been easy – a GTX 1060 or RX 580 would’ve been the card of choice. However, with the introduction of more recent AMD and Nvidia models, the sub $300 GPU performance hierarchy has changed.

Currently, Nvidia has the crown for the best graphics card under $300, with the GTX 1660 Ti and GTX 1660. But it’s no secret that AMD’s RX 590 is actually fairly close to the GTX 1660 when it comes to performance. However, with their power consumption and high TDP, they’re not the better choice. Instead, Nvidia’s got the overall win.

Nevertheless, to help you with your decision, below we have reviewed the top 5 best graphics cards under $300. We’ve got our GPU hierarchy ordered so that the best performers are first on the list, with some cheaper options that don’t perform as well a bit lower down on the list.

These are the best budget graphics cards between $300 and $200 for those looking to game at both 1080p and 1440p on medium to ultra-settings depending on the game. It is also important to note that just about any of these cards can run most modern titles pretty easily. If you have a lower GPU budget, you can check out the best graphics card under $200.

Best Graphics Cards Under $300:

  1. GTX 1660 Ti

MSI Gaming GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 192-bit HDMI/DP 6GB GDRR6 HDCP Support DirectX 12 Dual Fan VR Ready OC Graphics Card (GTX 1660 TI Ventus XS 6G OC)
As of a few months ago, the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1660 Ti is the best graphics card under $300. It’s a graphics card with their new Turing architecture, but one that doesn’t include ray tracing technology. This is what helps it keep a low price, and why it fits just right in builds where your GPU budget is $300.

That Turing chip comes with 1536 CUDA cores which is an excellent number. The memory has a base clock of 1500 MHz, but the boost clock is significantly higher, at 1770 MHz. You’re getting Nvidia’s GDDR6 memory, 6GB of it to be specific, which should help quite a bit at resolutions higher than 1080p. That GDDR6 memory comes with a speed of 12 Gbps, which is what allows the 192-bit memory to reach a maximum bandwidth of 288 GB/s. For a card that’s meant to be midrange at best, this is impressive.

And while with the red camp, something with this performance would easily require a massive PSU and very efficient cooling, the GTX 1660 Ti has a TDP of a mere 120W. It does require an 8-pin connector, but a 450W PSU is actually enough to power it, as well as the rest of your build. Last but not least, you’ll get all the latest connection options, such as Dual-link DVI-D, DisplayPort 1.4a, and HDMI 2.0b.

GTX 1660 Ti Specifications
Architecture Turing
Cuda Cores (Stream Processors for AMD) 1536
Memory Base Clock / Boost Clock 1500 MHz /1770 MHz
Memory Capacity / Type 6GB / GDDR6
Memory Interface Width / speed / bandwidth 192 Bit / 12 Gbps / 288 GB/s
TDP / Power Connections /

Recommended Power Supply Wattage

120W / 8-pin / 450W
Standard Display Connectors HDMI 2.0b, DisplayPort 1.4a, and Dual-Link DVI-D
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  1. GTX 1660

Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1660 OC 6G Graphics Card, 2X Windforce Fans, 6GB 192-bit GDDR5, Gv-N1660OC-6GD Video Card
Just like it was the case with the GTX 1050 Ti, the GTX 1660 Ti also has a marginally weaker performing, and marginally cheaper brother – the GTX 1660. It’s still a full-fledged Turing card, albeit with fewer CUDA cores and different, slower memory. If you can’t spring for the Ti, this GPU is a good alternative.

The first difference, as we mentioned, is in the CUDA cores – the regular GTX 1660 only has 1408, compared to the Ti’s 1536. It is, however, clocked slightly higher, with a base clock of 1530 and a boost clock of 1785. The memory is the other big thing because here you get slower, GDDR5 memory. This is certainly not a bad thing – the majority of the GPUs out there today use it. It caps out at 8 Gbps though, which gives the 192-bit bus a maximum bandwidth of 192 GB/s. Still great for a budget card.

In terms of power requirements and connectivity, the GTX 1660 has a 120W TDP and requires at least a 450W power supply with an 8-pin connector. It also comes with HDMI, DisplayPort, and Dual-Link DVI-D connections. This is identical to the Ti variant, so you aren’t missing out on anything here. Unless you need the faster memory and more CUDA cores, the regular GTX 1660 is actually an excellent option for users looking to get a midrange build or upgrade their aging GPU.

GTX 1660 Specifications
Architecture Turing
Cuda Cores (Stream Processors for AMD) 1408
Memory Base Clock / Boost Clock 1530 MHz /1785 MHz
Memory Capacity / Type 6GB / GDDR5
Memory Interface Width / speed / bandwidth 192 Bit / 8 Gbps / 192 GB/s
TDP / Power Connections /
Recommended Power Supply Wattage
120W / 8-pin / 450W
Standard Display Connectors HDMI 2.0b, DisplayPort 1.4a, and Dual-Link DVI-D
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  1. RX 590

Sapphire Radeon Nitro+ RX 590 8GB GDDR5 Dual HDMI/ DVI-D/ Dual DP OC w/ Backplate Special Edition (UEFI) PCI-E Graphic Cards 11289-01-20G
AMD has been notorious these past few years for releasing products that perform just as good as the competition, at prices that are often significantly lower. The RX 590 is the GTX 1660’s closest competitor when it comes to performance, and is one of the best graphics cards for the money. So, what do you get with AMD’s card? Let’s find out.

To begin with, this is still their Polaris architecture, so nothing new compared to their lower end models. It does come with 2304 stream processors, as well as a base clock speed of 1469 MHz, and a boost clock speed of 1545 MHz. Combine this with 8GB of GDDR5 memory, and you’ve got yourself a very solid performer. That memory comes with a 256-bit interface width, and at 8 Gbps, you’ll be getting 256 GB/s of bandwidth. So far, so good – great performance and a good price.

However, not everything is so shiny for the RX 590, and there’s one glaring downside to it, compared to the competition. The card’s TDP is 175W, which is quite a lot, and will generate a lot of heat. You’ll need great case cooling if you are to take advantage of it. You will also need at least a 500W power supply, while a 550W is what’s recommended, and one with an 8-pin connector. If you can look past the power requirements, the RX 590 is certainly among the best budget graphics cards.

GeForce GTX RX 590 Specifications
Architecture Polaris
Cuda Cores (Stream Processors for AMD) 2304
Memory Base Clock / Boost Clock 1469 MHz /1545 MHz
Memory Capacity / Type 8GB / GDDR5
Memory Interface Width / speed / bandwidth 256 Bit / 8 Gbps / 256 GB/s
TDP / Power Connections /
Recommended Power Supply Wattage
175W / 8-pin / 500-550W
Standard Display Connectors HDMI, DisplayPort 1.4 HDR
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  1. GTX 1060 (6GB)

EVGA GeForce GTX 1060 SC GAMING, ACX 2.0 (Single Fan), 6GB GDDR5, DX12 OSD Support (PXOC), 06G-P4-6163-KR
While Pascal isn’t Nvidia’s latest architecture, this is exactly why a previous-gen graphics card is on our list of best graphics cards under $300. The GTX 1060’s 6GB variant is the faster, more powerful midrange graphics card of the pair, and is what allows you to play 1080p games at high settings. And yes, even AAA titles are absolutely playable this way.

So, what is the GTX 1060? It’s a Pascal chip with 1280 CUDA cores and a memory that runs at 1506 MHz. If you force it to boost, it will go up to 1708 MHz, which is excellent. As we mentioned, this is the 6GB variant, so you’re getting 6GB of GDDR5/X memory. With a 192-bit interface width and a speed of 8 Gbps, you’re looking at 192 GB/s of bandwidth. Fairly impressive for a midrange card.

What’s even more impressive is how much this is going to cost you in terms of cooling and power. Namely, the GTX 1060 has a very manageable 120W TDP, so you can run it in just about any case. You’ll want to have at least a 400W power supply, and one with an extra 6-pin connector. There is plenty of connectivity, with everything from a Dual-Link DVI-D, to an HDMI 2.0b and a DisplayPort 1.4 port, all present on the card. If you want the best graphics card for the money, and don’t mind “the previous generation”, this should have you set.

GTX 1060 (6GB) Specifications
Architecture Pascal
Cuda Cores (Stream Processors for AMD) 1280
Memory Base Clock / Boost Clock 1506 MHz /1708MHz
Memory Capacity / Type 6GB / GDDR5/X
Memory Interface Width / speed / bandwidth 192 Bit / 8 Gbps / 192 GB/s
TDP / Power Connections /
Recommended Power Supply Wattage
120W / 6-pin / 400W
Standard Display Connectors HDMI 2.0b, DisplayPort 1.4, and Dual-Link DVI
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  1. GTX 1060 (3GB)

Gigabyte GeForce GTX 1060 Windforce OC 3GB GDDR5 Graphics Card
The Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 3GB variant is the more budget-oriented version, alongside its more powerful, 6GB brother. However, this is far from a bad GPU. If you don’t need the extra VRAM for higher resolutions and more textures, this could be a great way to save some money. You aren’t missing out on too much anyways.

This is one of Nvidia’s “previous-gen” Pascal graphics cards, which is in no way a bad thing. With 1152 CUDA cores and 3GB of GDDR5 memory, you should be good to go for anything but the most demanding titles. The memory has a base clock speed of 1506 MHz, but that can go up to 1708 MHz if necessary – just like the more powerful variant. And with a 192-bit bus and 8 Gbps speed, you’ll have 192 GB/s of bandwidth.

Thermals and power are good, too. You’re looking at a 120W TDP, which is certainly manageable, and a minimum of 400W in terms of power supply. The card does still require a 6-pin power connector. Last but not least, the port selection is very respectable – you have HDMI 2.0b, DisplayPort 1.4, as well as a Dual-Link DVI-D. All in all, a great budget graphics card, especially if that budget is under $300.

GTX 1060 (3GB) Specifications
Architecture Pascal
Cuda Cores (Stream Processors for AMD) 1152
Memory Base Clock / Boost Clock 1506 MHz /1708MHz
Memory Capacity / Type 3GB / GDDR5
Memory Interface Width / speed / bandwidth 192 Bit / 8 Gbps / 192 GB/s
TDP / Power Connections /
Recommended Power Supply Wattage
120W / 6-pin / 400W
Standard Display Connectors HDMI 2.0b, DisplayPort 1.4, and Dual-Link DVI
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